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Fellows

The purpose of Fellow status is to recognize and honor outstanding contributions to the science and practice of psychosocial oncology. Membership in the Fellowship is not purely honorific, however: it carries an expectation of ongoing contributions to and leadership within the Society.  View the APOS Fellow eligibility criteria.

KAREN KAYSER, MSW, PHD

Dr. Karen Kayser holds the Dr. LaRocca Chair in Oncology Social Work at the University of Louisville, Kent School of Social Work.  She earned in interdisciplinary PhD in Social Work and Psychology from the University of Michigan. Upon completing her PhD, she worked as an NICHD Post-doctoral Fellow on a clinical research with families coping with childhood cancer. This experience inspired her to pursue her career in psychosocial oncology with a particular focus on studying cancer within the context of families and intimate relationships. Read more here.

ANNA (NINA) MURIEL, MD, MPH

Dr. Anna (Nina) Muriel is a Child Psychiatrist and Chief of the Division of Pediatric Psychosocial Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI). After Adult and Child Psychiatry training at Massachusetts General and McLean Hospitals, she worked in the Marjorie E. Korff Parenting at a Challenging Time Program at MGH providing care to adults with cancer and their families. She developed the Parenting Concerns Questionnaire to measure the concerns of parents with cancer and co-authored the book “Raising an Emotionally Healthy Child When a Parent is Sick.”  Read more here.

CRISTINA POZO-KADERMAN, PHD

Cristina Pozo-Kaderman, Ph.D. is the Director of Clinical Operations for Cancer Support Services at Sylvester Cancer Center and Voluntary Faculty in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Miami for the past 3 years. She obtained her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Miami. She completed her internship at Cornell Medical College, Payne Whitney Clinic and her fellowship in psycho-oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She was at the Mount Sinai Cancer Center on Miami Beach for 22 years. She is a clinical psychologist & certified in sex therapist for oncology patients.  Read more here.

SHARLA WELLS-DI GREGORIO, PHD

Sharla Wells-Di Gregorio is an Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Division of Palliative Medicine at The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital where she provides clinical psychology services for Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Medicine. Dr. Wells-Di Gregorio completed her Ph.D. in clinical psychology at Northwestern University Medical School, a pre-doctoral internship at UCLA, and a postdoctoral fellowship in Biobehavioral Oncology at Ohio State. Her early research focused on the psychological and immune impact of caregiver stress for men whose wives had recurrent breast cancer.   Read more here.

GWEN WYATT, PHD, RN

Over the past 30+ years Dr. Gwen Wyatt pursued psychosocial oncology with a continuously funded program of research. She is a full professor in the College of Nursing at Michigan State University (MSU). Her research focuses on reducing symptoms and improving the quality of life of cancer patients, and, more recently, their informal caregivers. She has served as PI on nine completed studies focusing on psychosocial oncology. Specific interest areas include end of life care, integrative therapies and the economics of incorporating integrative therapies into mainstream health care. Her research of complementary therapies have evaluated acupressure, meditation, imagery, therapeutic touch, reminiscence therapy and reflexology.  Read more here.

 


History

At the 2012 APOS 9th Annual Conference, the APOS Board of Directors decided to explore establishing a Fellow status for the organization. A task force was formed in April 2012, and that task force presented a proposal to the Board in August recommending creation of this honorary status, as well as suggesting eligibility criteria and selection procedures.

At the 2013 APOS 10th Annual Conference, the APOS Board presented the first class of APOS fellows, individuals recognized for their outstanding contributions to the science and practice of psychosocial oncology. In honor of the 10th anniversary of the organization, 10 fellows were inducted.

View the previous classes of APOS Fellows 

Dr. Karen Kayser holds the Dr. LaRocca Chair in Oncology Social Work at the University of Louisville, Kent School of Social Work.  She earned in interdisciplinary PhD in Social Work and Psychology from the University of Michigan. Upon completing her PhD, she worked as an NICHD Post-doctoral Fellow on a clinical research with families coping with childhood cancer. This experience inspired her to pursue her career in psychosocial oncology with a particular focus on studying cancer within the context of families and intimate relationships.

After her post-doc, Dr. Kayser was offered an Assistant Professor position at the Graduate School of Social Work at Boston College where she taught and conducted research for the next 20 years. During her years in Boston, her research agenda focused on studying the interpersonal and cultural factors that impact adjustment to cancer.  She developed a couple-based intervention for breast cancer patients (Partners in Coping) and conducted a randomized controlled trial at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital.  She disseminated the Partners in Coping treatment protocol in the book Helping Couples Cope with Women’s Cancers: An evidence-based approach for practitioners (co-authored with Dr. Jennifer Scott; Springer, 2008).

In 2011, Dr. Kayser left Boston College to become the inaugural Endowed Chair in Oncology Social Work at the University of Louisville (UofL).  As the Dr. LaRocca Chair, she has developed innovative educational and research programs with the goal of building the workforce capacity to provide evidence-based psychosocial oncology services. Nationally, she established the first program in Psychosocial Oncology in a graduate school of social work. Her clinical research has focused on improving the delivery of distress screening and management services in cancer care.  She collaborated with Dr. Brad Zebrack and the Association of Oncology Social Work on A Project to Assure Quality Cancer Care (APAQCC) and the Patient-Centered Research Collaborative (PCRC). Her current research focuses on the promotion of cervical cancer screening and the HPV vaccination in rural Kentucky where rates of HPV-related cancers are among the highest in the nation. Dr. Kayser also serves as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Psychosocial Oncology.

Dr. Karen Kayser holds the Dr. LaRocca Chair in Oncology Social Work at the University of Louisville, Kent School of Social Work.  She earned in interdisciplinary PhD in Social Work and Psychology from the University of Michigan. Upon completing her PhD, she worked as an NICHD Post-doctoral Fellow on a clinical research with families coping with childhood cancer. This experience inspired her to pursue her career in psychosocial oncology with a particular focus on studying cancer within the context of families and intimate relationships.

After her post-doc, Dr. Kayser was offered an Assistant Professor position at the Graduate School of Social Work at Boston College where she taught and conducted research for the next 20 years. During her years in Boston, her research agenda focused on studying the interpersonal and cultural factors that impact adjustment to cancer.  She developed a couple-based intervention for breast cancer patients (Partners in Coping) and conducted a randomized controlled trial at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital.  She disseminated the Partners in Coping treatment protocol in the book Helping Couples Cope with Women’s Cancers: An evidence-based approach for practitioners (co-authored with Dr. Jennifer Scott; Springer, 2008).

In 2011, Dr. Kayser left Boston College to become the inaugural Endowed Chair in Oncology Social Work at the University of Louisville (UofL).  As the Dr. LaRocca Chair, she has developed innovative educational and research programs with the goal of building the workforce capacity to provide evidence-based psychosocial oncology services. Nationally, she established the first program in Psychosocial Oncology in a graduate school of social work. Her clinical research has focused on improving the delivery of distress screening and management services in cancer care.  She collaborated with Dr. Brad Zebrack and the Association of Oncology Social Work on A Project to Assure Quality Cancer Care (APAQCC) and the Patient-Centered Research Collaborative (PCRC). Her current research focuses on the promotion of cervical cancer screening and the HPV vaccination in rural Kentucky where rates of HPV-related cancers are among the highest in the nation. Dr. Kayser also serves as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Psychosocial Oncology.

Dr. Karen Kayser holds the Dr. LaRocca Chair in Oncology Social Work at the University of Louisville, Kent School of Social Work.  She earned in interdisciplinary PhD in Social Work and Psychology from the University of Michigan. Upon completing her PhD, she worked as an NICHD Post-doctoral Fellow on a clinical research with families coping with childhood cancer. This experience inspired her to pursue her career in psychosocial oncology with a particular focus on studying cancer within the context of families and intimate relationships.

After her post-doc, Dr. Kayser was offered an Assistant Professor position at the Graduate School of Social Work at Boston College where she taught and conducted research for the next 20 years. During her years in Boston, her research agenda focused on studying the interpersonal and cultural factors that impact adjustment to cancer.  She developed a couple-based intervention for breast cancer patients (Partners in Coping) and conducted a randomized controlled trial at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital.  She disseminated the Partners in Coping treatment protocol in the book Helping Couples Cope with Women’s Cancers: An evidence-based approach for practitioners (co-authored with Dr. Jennifer Scott; Springer, 2008).

In 2011, Dr. Kayser left Boston College to become the inaugural Endowed Chair in Oncology Social Work at the University of Louisville (UofL).  As the Dr. LaRocca Chair, she has developed innovative educational and research programs with the goal of building the workforce capacity to provide evidence-based psychosocial oncology services. Nationally, she established the first program in Psychosocial Oncology in a graduate school of social work. Her clinical research has focused on improving the delivery of distress screening and management services in cancer care.  She collaborated with Dr. Brad Zebrack and the Association of Oncology Social Work on A Project to Assure Quality Cancer Care (APAQCC) and the Patient-Centered Research Collaborative (PCRC). Her current research focuses on the promotion of cervical cancer screening and the HPV vaccination in rural Kentucky where rates of HPV-related cancers are among the highest in the nation. Dr. Kayser also serves as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Psychosocial Oncology.

Dr. Anna (Nina) Muriel is a Child Psychiatrist and Chief of the Division of Pediatric Psychosocial Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI). After Adult and Child Psychiatry training at Massachusetts General and McLean Hospitals, she worked in the Marjorie E. Korff Parenting at a Challenging Time Program at MGH providing care to adults with cancer and their families. She developed the Parenting Concerns Questionnaire to measure the concerns of parents with cancer and co-authored the book “Raising an Emotionally Healthy Child When a Parent is Sick.”

Her more recent work has been in Pediatric Psycho-social Oncology leading a multi-disciplinary clinical team at DFCI and participating in the development of the National Standards of Psychosocial Care for Children with Cancer. She has also explored the intersection between psychiatry and palliative care and psychopharmacology in pediatric oncology. She is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and co-edited “Pediatric Psychosocial Oncology: Textbook for Multidisciplinary Care.”

Cristina Pozo-Kaderman, Ph.D. is the Director of Clinical Operations for Cancer Support Services at Sylvester Cancer Center and Voluntary Faculty in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Miami for the past 3 years. She obtained her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Miami. She completed her internship at Cornell Medical College, Payne Whitney Clinic and her fellowship in psycho-oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She was at the Mount Sinai Cancer Center on Miami Beach for 22 years. She is a clinical psychologist & certified in sex therapist for oncology patients.

During graduate school she was awarded the Patricia Roberts Harris fellowship for minorities and women which provided support for her doctoral training and allowed her to develop her own research study for her Master’s and doctoral dissertation. She designed a longitudinal study following women from diagnosis to one year post treatment and women were assessed at 5 time periods with a combination of interview and standardized measures looking at coping strategies, social support, and marital satisfaction. This research study served a pilot project for grant application and award from ACS to look at how minority women adjust to a breast cancer diagnosis.

Dr. Pozo-Kaderman’s dream came true when she was accepted to MSKCC fellowship in psycho-oncology and she had the opportunity to work with Jimmie Holland, Paul Jacobsen, Steve Passik, Bill Redd, Lynna Lesko, and Bill Breitbart.

After returning from MSKCC, Dr. Pozo-Kaderman spent a year at the Sylvester Cancer Center as faculty in Psychiatry and helped establish the first psycho-oncology program at Sylvester. She was then offered the opportunity to create and develop the psychosocial program for south Florida for Salick Healthcare, which strongly supported psychosocial services (social work, psychological, psychiatric, nutritional, and palliative) being offered to all cancer patients and families. Her career at this point shifted and became more clinical care and administrative, but she continued to supervise clinically for a year-long practicum doctoral students from the University of Miami clinical health program, lecture on psychosocial oncology, and serve on dissertation committees. She has been actively involved in the community making presentations on psychosocial oncology issues, actively involved in Komen Kids, was on the founding board for the Cancer Support Community in Miami, and serve(s) as a local resource while keeping a busy clinical psycho-oncology practice and seeing oncology sex therapy cases. Most recently Dr. Pozo-Kaderman has been back at the University of Miami, Sylvester Cancer Center where she has administratively worked to develop and grow across the main campus and 7 satellites Cancer Support Services where patients receive free of charge music and art therapy, massage, exercise physiology, yoga, pet therapy, chaplaincy and spiritual counseling, patient resource centers, and volunteers. In addition she oversees services requiring insurance such psychology, psychiatry, and acupuncture, while continuing to clinically see patients and supervise psychology doctoral students. She has now developed a year-long program for nurses to help cope with compassion fatigue. She continues to be actively involved in community programs.

Sharla Wells-Di Gregorio is an Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Division of Palliative Medicine at The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital where she provides clinical psychology services for Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Medicine.  Dr. Wells-Di Gregorio completed her Ph.D. in clinical psychology at Northwestern University Medical School, a pre-doctoral internship at UCLA, and a postdoctoral fellowship in Biobehavioral Oncology at Ohio State.  Her early research focused on the psychological and immune impact of caregiver stress for men whose wives had recurrent breast cancer.  In 2005, she began her position with the palliative medicine team at OSU where she works primarily with patients and families with advanced cancer and at the end of life.  Her research focuses on translation and empirical validation of psychological multi-symptom interventions, evaluation of psychosocial oncology models of care, and studies to improve oncology communication, particularly for patients with serious illness. In her role at Ohio State, she developed a two-year Psychosocial Oncology & Palliative Medicine Fellowship Program to train clinical psychologists to provide evidence-based psychological and symptom management care for cancer patients.  She chaired the multi-disciplinary committee at the James Cancer Hospital to validate a distress measure, the James Supportive Care Screening, to identify patients’ most common and distressing comprehensive oncology concerns and connect them with Supportive Care Services.  She has served as Director of Professional Education for the American Psychosocial Oncology Society (2017-2022) for which she oversees a national committee of 20 individuals responsible for the education and training of psychologists, nurses, psychiatrists, and social workers.  The current focus of this committee’s work is creation and assessment of an Online Psychosocial Oncology Core Curriculum and establishment of productivity benchmarks for the field of psychosocial oncology.

 

Over the past 30+ years Dr. Gwen Wyatt pursued psychosocial oncology with a continuously funded program of research. She is a full professor in the College of Nursing at Michigan State University (MSU). Her research focuses on reducing symptoms and improving the quality of life of cancer patients, and, more recently, their informal caregivers. She has served as PI on nine completed studies focusing on psychosocial oncology. Specific interest areas include end of life care, integrative therapies and the economics of incorporating integrative therapies into mainstream health care. Her research of complementary therapies have evaluated acupressure, meditation, imagery, therapeutic touch, reminiscence therapy and reflexology. Her nurse-designed interventions for symptom management in the home address the shift in care from hospital to clinic to home. Findings from her work on supportive cancer care have been consistently disseminated nationally and internationally through publications and presentations.